#1 It
by Stephen King
When I was in first grade I was terrified after seeing the trailer for the movie version of this book (though, to be fair, this was largely due to a fifth grade girl spending the enter ride to and from school convincing me it was real after she overheard me telling a friend about it), so I figured it was high time I actually read it.  I wasn’t disappointed, because it’s incredible. The movie would make you think it’s a story about a killer clown, which isn’t the case — It is actually about a town possessed, for hundreds of years, by something with a taste for kids and incredible acts of violence.  
Bottom line:  Read the book. Oh, and if you’re inclined to see the movie after you do, don’t — sure, it’s considered a classic, but it pales in comparison and it’s about 4 hours long.
#2 How Did You Get This Number?
by Sloane Crosley
I liked Sloane’s first collection of stories, I Was Told There’d Be Cake, quite a bit — I think it was mostly a time and place thing for me, as I found the stories in that collection very ‘New York’ — but I was ultimately disappointed in her follow up. Sure, the stories contain the same humor and wit that I liked about Cake, but just when things would start to get good she’d run off on a tangent.
Bottom line:  There’s good to be found here, she has a tendency to ramble. Edit, girl!
#3 The Lover’s Dictionary
by David Levithan
I heard about this book on NPR on Valentines Day as I headed home. Levithan (co-author of Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist) basically picked random words out of the dictionary in alphabetical order and wrote definitions for them, telling the story of a relationship. It plays out in non-chronological order and though it is told from a male perspective, the other half of the relationship’s gender is never stated, which I found to be a refreshing conceit — allowing the reader to even more clearly see his or her relationship on the page.
Bottom line:  There are too many adjectives that I could use to describe this book, and all of them positive. It definitely joins the ranks of my other favorite book about love, On Love. Go buy it.

#1 It

by Stephen King

When I was in first grade I was terrified after seeing the trailer for the movie version of this book (though, to be fair, this was largely due to a fifth grade girl spending the enter ride to and from school convincing me it was real after she overheard me telling a friend about it), so I figured it was high time I actually read it.  I wasn’t disappointed, because it’s incredible. The movie would make you think it’s a story about a killer clown, which isn’t the case — It is actually about a town possessed, for hundreds of years, by something with a taste for kids and incredible acts of violence.  

Bottom line:  Read the book. Oh, and if you’re inclined to see the movie after you do, don’t — sure, it’s considered a classic, but it pales in comparison and it’s about 4 hours long.

#2 How Did You Get This Number?

by Sloane Crosley

I liked Sloane’s first collection of stories, I Was Told There’d Be Cake, quite a bit — I think it was mostly a time and place thing for me, as I found the stories in that collection very ‘New York’ — but I was ultimately disappointed in her follow up. Sure, the stories contain the same humor and wit that I liked about Cake, but just when things would start to get good she’d run off on a tangent.

Bottom line:  There’s good to be found here, she has a tendency to ramble. Edit, girl!

#3 The Lover’s Dictionary

by David Levithan

I heard about this book on NPR on Valentines Day as I headed home. Levithan (co-author of Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist) basically picked random words out of the dictionary in alphabetical order and wrote definitions for them, telling the story of a relationship. It plays out in non-chronological order and though it is told from a male perspective, the other half of the relationship’s gender is never stated, which I found to be a refreshing conceit — allowing the reader to even more clearly see his or her relationship on the page.

Bottom line:  There are too many adjectives that I could use to describe this book, and all of them positive. It definitely joins the ranks of my other favorite book about love, On Love. Go buy it.

  1. slim said: Looking forward to “The Lover’s Dictionary”! The timing couldn’t be more perfect, incidentally.
  2. xoxojk said: I really liked Lover’s Dictionary! And pretty much everything else by Levithan
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